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South Shore Neighborhoods

Explore the South Shore towns of Quincy, Milton, Braintree and Weymouth

Finding the right community for your lifestyle and family is essential. Each South Shore Community has their own style and feel.  Understanding local conditions on the South Shore is important when it comes to buying and selling real estate, but the neighborhood you choose can have a dramatic impact on all other aspects of your life as well.

Please feel free to browse through the complimentary South Shore information provided through the neighborhood links of Quincy, Braintree, Milton and Weymouth on the home page.   If you would like more information on certain aspects of each neighborhood, please  call Anita.   An area expert is the key to assist you with a neighborhood that would be a perfect fit for you.  Interested in another South Shore town?  Just ask, Anita has assisted many clients in finding homes all over the South Shore!

Anita will be here for you when you are ready to engage a real estate advocate who has experience, South Shore market knowledge, and the confidence to help you complete the best transaction possible.  Enjoy!

Community Information

Boston’s South Shore is more vibrant than ever!  There is always something exciting to do or see.  Whether it is taking in a show, enjoying an outdoor festival, attending a community class, or simply hanging out at the beach there is something for everyone.  It is the people that make the South Shore special.  This is a wonderfully diverse place to work, live, play and call home.

Milton   –  The town of Milton retains its old world charm in the 21st century.  Made up of 19th century homes, the town still has property boundaries made up of field stone.  The neighborhoods are filled with tree-lined streets and many acres of open space.  Curry College and Milton Academy among other private schools make their home here. Milton is a community that blends the contemporary while supporting its heritage.

To learn more about Milton go to city website:  Town of Milton

Quincy – “The City of Presidents.”  Quincy is the birthplace to the second president, John Adams and his son, the sixth president John Quincy Adams.   Only 17 square miles, Quincy borders the coastline and two natural peninsulas.  Today, Quincy attracts urban professionals for the affordable housing, ease of commute to Boston and the quality of life. Visit Discover Quincy to explore Quincy’s rich history and TasteQuincy for great places to dine.  Educational opportunities abound at Eastern Nazarene College and Quincy College.

To learn more about Quincy go to the city website:   Quincy

Weymouth – According to its residents, the people are the best part of the city of Weymouth.  Located just a few miles south of Boston, Weymouth is reinventing itself by redeveloping the Naval Air Station which is now known as Southfield and many other sites.

To learn more about Weymouth go to town’s website:  Weymouth

Braintree – The city of Braintree’s primary focus is its residents.  The highly rated school system and private schools including Thayer Academy and Archbishop Williams High School are benefits for families.  The abundance of parks and recreational opportunities promote community activities. It also boasts commuter access to Boston via the Red Line of the T.

To learn more about Braintree go to the town’s website:  Braintree

waterfront

Tips for Finding the Perfect Neighborhood

1. Drive the neighborhoods and take note of the area and what features it has. Drive around and find routes to shopping centers, schools and routes you will take to work.

2.  Rate what the best features are in each neighborhood and which features you want or need close to you.  This step will help you decide on neighborhoods and locations.

  • Is the area appealing to you?
  • Are you close enough to schools and shopping?
  • Do you want to live on a quiet street or cul-de-sac?
  • Is the neighborhood clean and people take pride in their homes?
  • Are the homes landscaping well kept?
  • Is the neighborhood easily accessible for pedestrians?
  • Does the neighborhood feel safe?
  • Ask Anita for the current market conditions for the specific neighborhoods?
  • Research homes for sale, are there a lot of for sale signs?
  • Ask Anita for the demographics of the area and about community events?

3.  Tour the neighborhood by foot.  This is a great way to meet the neighbors and get a true feeling of the neighborhood.  Stop by some local restaurants or shops and speak to the local residents to get a good feel of the community.

4.  Map your work commute.  Drive the neighborhood at the times you will be leaving for work and coming home.  Map your complete commute.  Is this acceptable to you?